Yellow class, fall session

In the fall, Yellow class will use the story book A Bucketful of Dreams by Chris Buice.

Table of contents

Sep 13, 20 — Getting to know you games, and “The Frog Prince”
Sep 20, 20 — “Fruits”
Sep 27, 20 — “The Beautiful Tiger”
Oct 4, 20 — “Higgins, a Drop with a Dream”
Oct 18, 20 — “David and Goliath”
Oct 25, 20 — “Let My People Go”
Nov 1, 20 — “God’s Hat”

———

Sep 13, 20 — Getting to know you games, and “The Frog Prince”

Opening:

As you admit the children from the Zoom waiting room, greet them. It will probably take five minutes before everyone is in class. Once everyone is in the Zoom meeting, light a chalice where the children can see it. Have everyone say the usual words for lighting a chalice: “We light this chalice to celebrate Unitarian Universalism — the religion of the open mind, helping hands, and loving heart.”

Now give each child a chance to say a good thing and a bad thing that has happened in the past week. You may want to tell the children in advance what order you will call on them (that way, they know that you have a plan, and there won’t be the temptation to start talking all at once).

Overview of the year:

Briefly tell the children what you’ll be doing together in Sunday school this year. Say something like this:

“This year in Sunday school, we’ll be meeting about three times a month. Each week, we’ll read a story from a story book. And if you want your own copy of the story books, your parents can pick up copies just for you at UUCPA. Then after we have a story, we’ll also have time for some kind of fun activity.”

Story:

Read aloud “The Frog Prince” on p. 54 of A Bucketful of Dreams. Ask the children what they think of the story. Of course, we know that in the real world, frogs do not need humans to kiss them. How could humans show love to a frog? Maybe by protecting the swamps they live in, so that they have a place to live!

Games to play:

Now you can play some games for fun, and to get to know one another a little bit. Click here for games you can play on Zoom. “Simon Says (UU Version)” might be a good game for this class to play together. “Single Item Scavenger Hunt” might also be good.

Closing:

Do a quick review of the session. Ask the children:
What did we do today? (heard a story, played a game)
What was the most important part of the story? (or, if you prefer, “What was the moral of the story?”)
Of the things we did today, what did you like best?

Say the unison benediction together:
Go out into the world in peace
Be of good courage
Hold fast to what is good
Return no one evil for evil
Strengthen the faint-hearted
Support the weak
Help the suffering
Rejoice in beauty
Speak love with word and deed
Honor all beings.

Say good bye as they leave the Zoom meeting!

———

Sep 20, 20 — “Fruits”

Opening:

As you admit the children from the Zoom waiting room, greet them. It will probably take five minutes before everyone is in class. Once everyone is in the Zoom meeting, light a chalice where the children can see it. Have everyone say the usual words for lighting a chalice: “We light this chalice to celebrate Unitarian Universalism — the religion of the open mind, helping hands, and loving heart.”

Now give each child a chance to say a good thing and a bad thing that has happened in the past week. You may want to tell the children in advance what order you will call on them (that way, they know that you have a plan, and there won’t be the temptation to start talking all at once).

Story and questions:

Read aloud “Fruits” in A Bucketful of Dreams, p. 46.

Some questions to think about:
The plant in the story wasn’t really an apple tree, it was a thorn bush. Why did the plant pretend to be an apple tree?
The man in the story wasn’t really a good man, because he wouldn’t help the woman and her daughter. Why did the man pretend to be good?

activity:

Play some more games this week, so everyone can get to know each other better. Click here for games you can play on Zoom. “Simon Says (UU Version)” might be a good game for this class to play together. “Single Item Scavenger Hunt” might also be good.

Second story

Sometimes the children in this age group just like to hear stories over Zoom. If you’d like to read a second story, read “Rivers” on p. 58 of A Bucketful of Dreams.

Closing:

Do a quick review of the session. Ask the children:
What story did we hear today?
What was the most important part of the story?
What part did you like best?

Say the unison benediction together:
Go out into the world in peace
Be of good courage
Hold fast to what is good
Return no one evil for evil
Strengthen the faint-hearted
Support the weak
Help the suffering
Rejoice in beauty
Speak love with word and deed
Honor all beings.

Say good bye as they leave the Zoom meeting!

———

Sep 27, 20 — “The Beautiful Tiger”

Opening:

As you admit the children from the Zoom waiting room, greet them. It will probably take five minutes before everyone is in class. Once everyone is in the Zoom meeting, light a chalice where the children can see it. Have everyone say the usual words for lighting a chalice: “We light this chalice to celebrate Unitarian Universalism — the religion of the open mind, helping hands, and loving heart.”

Now give each child a chance to say a good thing and a bad thing that has happened in the past week. You may want to tell the children in advance what order you will call on them (that way, they know that you have a plan, and there won’t be the temptation to start talking all at once).

Story and discussion:

Read aloud “The Beautiful Tiger” on p. 5 of A Bucketful of Dreams.

Some questions to think about:
Why did the man tell the tiger that she was weak and puny?
Why do you think the tiger never tried to open the door to her cage?

Activity:

How about another game this week? Click here for games you can play on Zoom. You could try playing “Change One Thing.” For this age group, you might want to start where YOU “change one thing” in YOUR space, and see if the kids can find out what you’ve changed. Then move on to the children where the parents are sitting right with the child.

SECOND STORY

If you’d like to read a second story, read “The Cure” on p. 51 of A Bucketful of Dreams.

Closing:

Do a quick review of the session. Ask the children:
What story did we hear today?
What was the most important part of the story?
What part did you like best?

Say the unison benediction together:
Go out into the world in peace
Be of good courage
Hold fast to what is good
Return no one evil for evil
Strengthen the faint-hearted
Support the weak
Help the suffering
Rejoice in beauty
Speak love with word and deed
Honor all beings.

Say good bye as they leave the Zoom meeting!

———

Oct 4, 20 — “Higgins, a Drop with a Dream”

Opening:

As you admit the children from the Zoom waiting room, greet them. It will probably take five minutes before everyone is in class. Once everyone is in the Zoom meeting, light a chalice where the children can see it. Have everyone say the usual words for lighting a chalice: “We light this chalice to celebrate Unitarian Universalism — the religion of the open mind, helping hands, and loving heart.”

Now give each child a chance to say a good thing and a bad thing that has happened in the past week. You may want to tell the children in advance what order you will call on them (that way, they know that you have a plan, and there won’t be the temptation to start talking all at once).

Story and discussion:

Read aloud “Higgins, a Drop with a Dream” on p. 1 of A Bucketful of Dreams.

Children in gr. K-1 may not know the phrase “a drop in the bucket.” Nevertheless, they can understand the main point of the story.

Some questions to talk about:
Higgins was a drop of water. If you want to water your flowers, is one drop of water enough? How many drops of water do you need to water a flower?
What if you need to water a whole garden? How many drops of water do you need?
What if you need to water the whole state of California? How many drops of water do you need?

Activity:

A poem by the Unitarian minister Edward Everett Hale has much the same message as the story about Higgins:

I am only one.
But still I am one.
I cannot do everything.
But still I can do something.
And because I cannot do everything
I will not refuse to do the something that I can do.

SECOND STORY

If you’d like to read a second story, read “The Beauty Contest” on p. 43 of A Bucketful of Dreams.

Closing:

Do a quick review of the session. Ask the children:
What story did we hear today?
What was the most important part of the story?
What part did you like best?

Say the unison benediction together:
Go out into the world in peace
Be of good courage
Hold fast to what is good
Return no one evil for evil
Strengthen the faint-hearted
Support the weak
Help the suffering
Rejoice in beauty
Speak love with word and deed
Honor all beings.

Say good bye as they leave the Zoom meeting!

———

Oct 18, 20 — “David and Goliath”

Opening:

As you admit the children from the Zoom waiting room, greet them. It will probably take five minutes before everyone is in class. Once everyone is in the Zoom meeting, light a chalice where the children can see it. Have everyone say the usual words for lighting a chalice: “We light this chalice to celebrate Unitarian Universalism — the religion of the open mind, helping hands, and loving heart.”

Now give each child a chance to say a good thing and a bad thing that has happened in the past week. You may want to tell the children in advance what order you will call on them (that way, they know that you have a plan, and there won’t be the temptation to start talking all at once).

Story and discussion:

Read aloud “David and Goliath” on p. 17 of A Bucketful of Dreams.

The children may not know what “sling” is, and the difference between a sling and a slingshot. Using a sling, you can throw a rock with great accuracy and at high velocity. You might want to show the children the first 20 second of this video showing someone breaking bottles with a sling.

Some things to think about:
When you’re a child, it seems like everyone is bigger and stronger than you are. When you’re a child, you may feel that there’s nothing you can do to fix problems in the world. The story of David and Goliath shows that even kids can take on big problems.
Are you worried about any big problems?
Is there anything that a kid can do to help solve that big problem?

Activity:

Last week, we heard a poem by Unitarian minister Edward Everett Hale that had pretty much the same message as last week’s story. And it also has pretty much the same message as this week’s story:

I am only one.
But still I am one.
I cannot do everything.
But still I can do something.
And because I cannot do everything
I will not refuse to do the something that I can do.

SECOND STORY

If you’d like to read a second story, read “Two Frogs” on p. 38 of A Bucketful of Dreams.

Closing:

Check out, unison benediction.

Do a quick review of the session. Ask the children:
What story did we hear today?
What was the most important part of the story?
What part did you like best?

Say the unison benediction together:
Go out into the world in peace
Be of good courage
Hold fast to what is good
Return no one evil for evil
Strengthen the faint-hearted
Support the weak
Help the suffering
Rejoice in beauty
Speak love with word and deed
Honor all beings.

Say good bye as they leave the Zoom meeting!

Check out, unison benediction.

———

Oct 25, 20 — “Let My People Go”

Opening:

As you admit the children from the Zoom waiting room, greet them. It will probably take five minutes before everyone is in class. Once everyone is in the Zoom meeting, light a chalice where the children can see it. Have everyone say the usual words for lighting a chalice: “We light this chalice to celebrate Unitarian Universalism — the religion of the open mind, helping hands, and loving heart.”

Now give each child a chance to say a good thing and a bad thing that has happened in the past week. You may want to tell the children in advance what order you will call on them (that way, they know that you have a plan, and there won’t be the temptation to start talking all at once).

Story and discussion:

Read aloud “Let My People Go” on p. 8 of A Bucketful of Dreams.

Some of the children in the class might not have heard of Rosa Parks before, and it would be a good idea to spend a little time talking about who she was.

Activity:

Last week, we heard a poem by Unitarian minister Edward Everett Hale that went like this:

I am only one.
But still I am one.
I cannot do everything.
But still I can do something.
And because I cannot do everything
I will not refuse to do the something that I can do.

Think about what Rosa Parks did. All she did was to refuse to give up her seat on the bus to a white person. She could not do everything. But she could do something to make the world more fair.

SECOND STORY

If you’d like to read a second story, read “Daniel in the Lion’s Den” on p. 56 of A Bucketful of Dreams.

OR if you have a children’s book about Rosa Parks, you might want to read some or all of that book to the children.

Closing:

Check out, unison benediction.

Do a quick review of the session. Ask the children:
What story did we hear today?
What was the most important part of the story?
What part did you like best?

Say the unison benediction together:
Go out into the world in peace
Be of good courage
Hold fast to what is good
Return no one evil for evil
Strengthen the faint-hearted
Support the weak
Help the suffering
Rejoice in beauty
Speak love with word and deed
Honor all beings.

Say good bye as they leave the Zoom meeting!

Check out, unison benediction.

———

Nov 1, 20 — “God’s Hat”

Preparation:

If you can, make a paper hat. Color one side red, and the other side blue. Wear the hat while you tell the story! Paper hat instructions.

Opening:

As you admit the children from the Zoom waiting room, greet them. It will probably take five minutes before everyone is in class. Once everyone is in the Zoom meeting, light a chalice where the children can see it. Have everyone say the usual words for lighting a chalice: “We light this chalice to celebrate Unitarian Universalism — the religion of the open mind, helping hands, and loving heart.”

Now give each child a chance to say a good thing and a bad thing that has happened in the past week. You may want to tell the children in advance what order you will call on them (that way, they know that you have a plan, and there won’t be the temptation to start talking all at once).

Story and discussion:

Read aloud “God’s Hat” on p. 13 of A Bucketful of Dreams.

If you can, make a paper hat with one side that’s red, and one side that’s blue. (You can even show the children how to fold a paper hat.) Put on the hat, and turn your head one way, and ask the children what color the hat is. Then turn your head the other way, and ask the children what color the hat is.

Some questions to talk over:
In the story, some people said God’s hat was red. Some people said God’s hat was blue. Who was right? (maybe both were right, or maybe both were wrong since the hat was neither all red nor all blue).
Why did the people argue about what color God’s hat was?

Activity:

There’s a poem by the Universalist poet Edwin Markham that has pretty much the same message as this week’s story. See if you agree:

They drew a circle that shut me out —
Heretic, rebel, a thing to flout.
But Love and I had the wit to win:
We drew a circle that took them in.

You’ll have to explain some of the words in this poem, especially “heretic,” and “flout.” More important is the idea that when someone draws a circle to shut you out, YOU can draw a BIGGER circle to include them.

So, in the story, instead of arguing whether God’s hat was red or blue, the people could have said — Let’s find out what we agree on. Let’s find out what we have in common.

SECOND STORY

If you’d like to read a second story, read “Enemies” on p. 36 of A Bucketful of Dreams.

Closing:

Do a quick review of the session. Ask the children:
What story did we hear today?
What was the most important part of the story?
What part did you like best?

Say the unison benediction together:
Go out into the world in peace
Be of good courage
Hold fast to what is good
Return no one evil for evil
Strengthen the faint-hearted
Support the weak
Help the suffering
Rejoice in beauty
Speak love with word and deed
Honor all beings.

Say good bye as they leave the Zoom meeting!